Mental Health Awareness Month


The events in the past year have tested emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual endurance. Your thoughts, feelings, and actions are seen and heard. We pray that these resources may be a source of help, understanding, and consolation.


We continue to offer support for all our parishioners – children, teens, families, and adults of all ages. During the pandemic and other times, stress and anxieties can impact any of us. Knowing you are not alone and that resources are available can be helpful.

Included below are articles about suicide, a topic difficult to think about or broach. We acknowledge that among us there have been, and are, those who have suffered with such despair that they no longer want to be alive. We pray that these resources may be a source of help, understanding, and consolation.

Our committee keeps all of you in prayer.

· Pandemic takes Mental Health Toll on US Youngsters

· Timely Tips for Staying Mentally and Spiritually Healthy in COVID Times

· Depression and Suicide — A Catholic Perspective

· Help Guide – Suicide Prevention 

· Archdiocesan Support about Mental Health & Depression

· Find a Catholic Therapist

Headspace and the LA County Department of Mental Health

We’re all going through the current crisis together. To help you weather this storm, Headspace and the LA County Department of Mental Health have partnered to provide support and resources during this challenging time.

Sign up to access meditations, as well as sleep and movement exercises, designed to help you care for your mind — all free through 2020.

Click here for more information and resources.

LA County Department of Mental Health Resources:

The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH) supports the wellbeing of our County family, friends and colleagues. News and updates about COVID-19 may trigger anxiety, panic, frustration and depression—even when your risk of getting sick is low. During an infectious disease outbreak, please take the time to care for your own physical and mental health, and please reach out to others in kindness and compassion.

Click here for more information and resources.

If you or someone you love is in distress, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK.

Daily Life and Coping: Tips from the CDC

Ways to cope with stress

– Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
– Take care of your body.
– Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate.
– Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals.
– Exercise regularlyget plenty of sleep.
– Avoid alcohol and drugs.
– Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
– Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Click here for more information and resources.

Compassion Fatigue and Resilience: Webinar with Dr. Xavier Cagigas

The events in the past year have tested emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual endurance. Experts refer to the exhaustion and depletion that many have felt as compassion fatigue. As guidelines continue to change, restrictions lessen, our families and communities are called to transition and adjust once more.  Individuals continue to process grief and trauma from the past year while adapting to a new sense of normalcy. Learn the signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue and how to face each day with resilience and hope. Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Register Here.

Hope and Healing

As pastors and bishops, we understand that mental health is a critical component of wellbeing.  Therefore, ministering to those who suffer from mental illness is an essential part of the pastoral care of the Church.  This letter represents a statement by Catholic pastors, in consultation with those who suffer from mental illness, their families and loved ones, health care practitioners, and other caregivers. Read more

PDF – EnglishSpanish or Vietnamese